Elijah Anderson (Yale) edits "Inner-City Schools: Inequality and Urban Education"...

Elijah Anderson (Yale)

Elijah Anderson (Yale)

Inner-City Schools: Inequality and Urban Education

 

Selected Abstracts and Introductions:

  • GENDER, RACE, CLASS, AND THE POLITICS OF SCHOOLING IN THE INNER CITY

673 Annals Am. Acad. Pol. & Soc. Sci. 12

Vivian L. Gadsden (UPenn)

The politics of gender, race, and class are present within and outside of schools, and are pivotal issues raised in the policies and practices of schooling. This article focuses on the ways in which gender, race, and class are addressed within institutional practices and politics, both historically and in contemporary inner-city schooling. I examine gender, race, and class as integrated or intersectional identities, rather than as isolated status categories. The discussion highlights experiences and perspectives of African American youth who identify as girls to depict the complex intersectional dynamics of gender, race, and class; and argues that these dynamics influence, if not dictate, the quality of their in-school and life experiences. I then identify new directions for research and practice that recognize and build upon inner-city students' intersectional identities, urging policy initiatives that promote educational success while advancing equal educational opportunity.

  • THE COMPLEX DYNAMICS OF TRUST AND LEGITIMACY: UNDERSTANDING INTERACTIONS BETWEEN THE POLICE AND POOR BLACK NEIGHBORHOOD RESIDENTS

673 Annals Am. Acad. Pol. & Soc. Sci. 132

Waverly Duck (Pitt)

This article demonstrates how various forms of surveillance can lead to coping strategies that are corrosive of trust and legitimacy between black neighborhood residents and law enforcement. This article introduces the coping strategy of submissive civility as a method of self-preservation enacted in social situations where power relations are asymmetrical and the dominant party can administer sanctions. Reporting on an ethnographic study of residents' interactions with police and other agents of surveillance, this article surveys a range of problems that residents face as they try to meet conflicting demands while avoiding sanctions. The analysis shows that issues of trust, legitimacy, and the discretionary authority of police and other outsiders in the neighborhood pervade these interactions. Further, the analysis highlights the complex ways in which family dynamics, unemployment, debt, and drug dealing intersect with the activities of law enforcement and the threat of imprisonment that is woven into the fabric of residents' lives.

  • THE FIGHT: DISCIPLINE AND RACE IN AN INNER-CITY PUBLIC CHARTER HIGH SCHOOL

673 Annals Am. Acad. Pol. & Soc. Sci. 150

Vani S. Kulkarnia (UPenn)

What are the disciplinary practices in which inner-city schools engage? How is order maintained or restored? Drawing on a three-year ethnographic study of a public charter school in Philadelphia, this study demonstrates the significance of understanding school discipline through a cultural lens. Beginning with a case study of a fight in the cafeteria, I describe how teachers, administrators, and students made sense of the school's disciplinary ethos and how the disciplinary gaze that pervaded the school put invisible pressure on staff and students. Teachers and administrators in charge of discipline, who were overwhelmingly white, made implicit racial appeals regarding what practices were the most effective and fair to students who were overwhelmingly black and from single-parent, economically precarious households in urban neighborhoods.

  • THE DIMENSIONS OF RACIALIZATION AND THE INNER-CITY SCHOOL

673 Annals Am. Acad. Pol. & Soc. Sci. 312

Matthew W. Hughey (UConn), Carol Ann Jackson (UConn)

The articles in this issue together articulate the varied ways in which inequality and urban education intersect and interact. Woven throughout is a common denominator that binds these particular investigations--the concept of race. Heretofore, scholarly analyses of race and educational inequality have reached heterogeneous conclusions: from race as a reified identity correlated with educational disparities, to urban education as an institution that promotes virulent ideologies, to racialized patterns of interaction that reproduce educational stratification.  We draw upon these articles to synthesize these perspectives and articulate the relationship between urban education and race as an ongoing feedback loop: race (re)produces the phenomena of urban education, while urban education (re)forms race. The intertwining of these two reproduces both the dominant meanings of race and the hierarchical location of racial groups in the social order across five key domains: ideologies, institutions, interests, identities, and interactions.

List of Symposium Articles:

Vivian L. Gadsden

Charles M. Payne, Cristina M. Ortiz

Elijah Anderson

Gloria Ladson-Billings

Tim Bouman

Luke Anderson

Mardia Cooper

Rodney Walker

Waverly Duck

Vani S. Kulkarni

Cid Martinez

John M. Hagedorn

Saunjuhi Verma, Patricia Maloney, Duke W. Austin

Henri Peretz

Jean-Michel Chapoulie

David Lepoutre

Celia Bense Ferreira Alves, Michel Nguyen Duc Long

William Kornblum

Matthew W. Hughey, Carol Ann Jackson